Inflation and Supply Chain Issues Affecting Central Coast Food Banks

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The rising inflation sweeping the country is not only impacting consumers, but also local food banks which help hundreds of thousands of Central Coast residents. “It affects the types of food we can get, the cost of the food, and obviously with that the shortage of trucks, the shortage of truckers as well as the cost of getting that food to us is increasing,” said Suzanne Willis, Director of Development for the Second Harvest Food Bank in Watsonville. The problem spills over to local pantries who depend on the food bank for most of their food. source of protein that we don’t have right now because the food bank doesn’t, ”said Ashley Bridges, executive director of Pajaro Valley Loaves & Fishes in downtown Watsonville. In some cases, the pantry has to cut back on the distribution of some hard-to-obtain items. “We also top up when we can, it is expensive to buy rice and beans, but if we are in a rush or it looks like the shortage is going to last longer than a week or two we will buy it ourselves. Bridges said. Food banks across the central coast expect to see increased demand for their services as prices across the board continue to rise. Those with limited incomes will have less to spend on food because they spend more on gasoline, utilities and rent. “This will allow a family to really spend more in areas where they don’t necessarily have help,” Willis said.

The rising inflation sweeping the country is not only impacting consumers, but also local food banks which help hundreds of thousands of Central Coast residents.

“It affects the types of food we can get, the cost of the food, and obviously with that the shortage of trucks, the shortage of truckers as well as the cost of getting that food to us is increasing,” said Suzanne Willis, Director of Development for the Second Harvest Food Bank in Watsonville.

The problem spills over to local pantries who depend on the food bank for most of their food.

“We get 90 percent of all our food from the food bank and something like tuna which is a great source of protein that we don’t have right now because the food bank doesn’t,” said Ashley Bridges, Executive Director of the Pajaro Valley Loaves & Fishes in downtown Watsonville.

In some cases, the pantry must reduce the distribution of certain hard-to-obtain items.

“We also top up when we can, it is expensive to buy rice and beans, but if we are in a rush or it looks like the shortage is going to last longer than a week or two, we will buy it ourselves- same, ”said Bridges. .

Food banks across the central coast expect to see increased demand for their services as prices across the board continue to rise. Those with limited incomes will have to spend less on food as they spend more on gasoline, utilities, and rent.

“This will allow a family to really run out of dollars in areas where they don’t necessarily have help,” Willis said.


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